Bean Sprout Salad (숙주나물)

Bean Sprout Salad recipe | savoringsimple.com

Korean Bean Sprout Salad, or Sukjuknamul (숙주나물) is a banchan (side dish) served with meals or inside of bibimbap (rice, veggies, and egg) or mandu (Korean dumplings).

This bean sprout salad is very similar to the spinach salad I made last week-cook the bean sprouts, then combine them with a dressing of sesame oil, garlic, sesame seeds, green onions and seasoning. From there, you can serve it as banchan or use it in another recipe.

Korean Bean Sprout Salad-lots of healthy fats and fiber | savoringsimple.com

Fun Health fact:

Mung Bean sprouts are full of fiber, high in vitamins C and K, low in calories, and easy to digest-in fact, most grains or legumes are easier to digest once sprouted, and your body has an easier time soaking up the nutrients. This is why many people with gluten sensitivities sprout their grains! For more information about the benefits of consuming sprouts, read this article. We eat sprouted grains and legumes regularly-in salads, pizzas, and even meatballs!

Note of caution:

It is always important to wash your fruits or vegetables before eating, even if they’re organic, and this is especially true of bean sprouts (even though you cook them in this recipe, it’s still a good idea to wash them first). Because of the climate they grow in (warm and moist) bean sprouts can carry bacteria that might cause food poisoning. No need for alarm, just give them a quick rinse before using.

Enjoy this bean sprout salad at room temperature. Serves 2-3 as a side dish.

Korean Bean Sprout Salad (숙주나물)

5 from 1 reviews
Bean Sprout Salad (숙주나물)
Author: 
Recipe type: Side
Cuisine: Korean
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 2-3
 
Ingredients
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 green onion, minced
  • 1 T. sesame oil
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 2 tsp. sesame seeds
  • 2 cups bean sprouts, washed and drained
  • 3-4 cups water
Instructions
  1. In a large pot, bring several cups of water to boil (enough to cover the bean sprouts). Once boiling, plunge beans into the water and cook for 3-5 min or until translucent.
  2. Remove beans from water, drain, and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking.
  3. Combine dressing ingredients, then mix dressing and bean sprouts in a bowl and serve.
Do you eat bean sprouts? Do you do any sprouting yourself?

Patjuk (팥죽) Korean Red Bean Porridge

Red bean porridge, known as Patjuk (팥죽) in Korea, is  served on December 22, the Winter Solstice. Because of it’s red color, which symbolizes yang, or positive energy, it was believed to drive evil spirits away and prevent diseases.

Koreans also tend to eat hot foods in the summer-something about beating the heat with more heat-so this dish is prepared in summer, too. One of my favorite ways to eat it in the summer is on top of Korean ice cream…the combination is just magical.

There’s lots of tiny variations to the recipe, but I chose to follow the basic guidelines a Korean friend told me: Boil beans, boil them again, smush, and add sweetener and glutinous rice flour. Serve. (For my recipe, I chose to use honey instead of the more traditional white sugar, since I’m trying to cut down on processed sweets.)

Often, the dish comes with glutinous rice balls as well, but I chose to leave those out (I honestly get plenty of rice in my body as it is). If you’d like to learn more about red bean porridge origins and learn to make the rice balls (it’s very easy, I have done it before), here’s a great article from the Korea Times.

Of course, it makes sense that this meal was served during the long winter months, when vegetables (and therefore fiber and nutrients) were lacking, and the main dish was rice.

Red beans are a high source of soluble and insoluble fiber, iron, protein, antioxidants, and B vitamins, as well as being low in fat…I thought this article was a handy and quick overview of the benefits of red beans.

Patjuk (팥죽)

Korean Red Bean Porridge

5 from 1 reviews
Patjuk (팥죽) Korean Red Bean Porridge
Author: 
Cuisine: Korean
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 2-3
 
Ingredients
  • 2 cup red beans, cooked
  • 1 cup water
  • Mix together: 3 T. glutinous rice flour and 3 T. water
  • ½ t. salt
  • 1 t. cinnamon
  • 2-6 T. honey, to taste
Instructions
  1. Place red beans and 1 cup water in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth.
  2. Cook beans and water mixture over medium heat, stirring occasionally to prevent burning. Slowly add the glutinous rice and water mixture, whisking quickly to prevent lumps from forming. After 10 minutes, add in salt, cinnamon, and sugar to taste. Heat for 2-5 minutes, then serve as a desert with a garnish of nuts of honey.
  3. Note: You may choose to only add 2 T. of sugar/honey, and then allow individuals to add based on preference.
Patjuk Red Bean Porridge is high in protein, iron, and antioxidants. Easy and delicious! | savoringsimple.com

Do you eat red beans? Tell me about it and comment below! 

 

 

Japchae (잡채)

Gluten Free Japchae, an easy and quick dish with lots of superfoods. Guilt-free!

Japchae ( 잡채) is one of my favorite Korean foods-partially because it’s delicious, and partially because it’s naturally gluten-free, and partially because the noodles are just plain fun to play with.

Chewy, gluten-free, entertaining Korean noodles? Count me in.

Japchae (or chap-chae) was first introduced to me while I was eating Dak Galbi at a local restaurant-after most of the vegetables and meat had been eaten, our server brought us a dish of glass noodles to mix into the leftover seasonings and meat. We were eating with our employer, who explained that the noodles were made from sweet potato starch and often served at special events, and had been invented for a king in the Joseon Dynasty. (Read more about the Joseon Dynasty and my trip to Minsokchon Village.)

I was hooked. The next time I was at the grocery store, I purchased a bag of the glass noodles (or dangmyeon) even though I had no idea what to do with them.

My first two attempts at Japchae were more or less awful. Sam actually wouldn’t eat it, and I could barely finish my bowl. I gave up for many weeks, but since making this recipe, we’ve been eating much more Japchae at home-sometimes for lunch and dinner.

The first secret to this recipe…

cook the carrots and sweet potatoes first, so they’re cooked all the way. I like my carrots not-too-soft, but there is nothing worse than an under-cooked sweet potato.

The second secret…

don’t be afraid to taste-teste your veggies and pasta as you go along. My first dishes were entirely too bland, but Japchae noodles will soak up almost any flavoring you throw in, which is what makes them so brilliant! Keep adding sesame oil and soy sauce as needed-I’m a huge fan of the sesame oil, and most restaurants I’ve had Japchae at were not sparing in that department.

Ok, here’s the run down for making Japchae yourself (pictures below):

  1. Marinade beef (anywhere between 30 min to overnight)

  2. Cook spinach, chop it up, and set aside.

  3. Stir-fry everything else in this order: carrots and sweet potatoes, meat and onions, green onions and pepper.

  4. Cook noodles, drain, cut into smaller pieces, and mix with sesame oil/soy sauce.

  5. Cook/scramble 2 eggs.

  6. Throw everything together, toss with more sesame oil/soy sauce to taste, and top with sesame seeds.

Easy-peasy. More detailed directions below, but seriously, feel free to deviate and experiment!

Japchae Ingredients | savoringsimple.com

Japchae-Korean Noodles | savoringsimple.com

Japchae Recipe | savoringsimple.com

Japchae Recipe: Easy, healthy, light, and full of superfoods! | savoringsimple.com

Delicious Japchae gluten free | savoringsimple.com

Japchae

(Serves 2-3)

5 from 1 reviews
Japchae (잡채)
Author: 
Cuisine: Korean
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 2-3
 
Ingredients
  • 1 carrot, julienned
  • 1 sweet potato, julienned
  • 1 onion, sliced thin
  • 2-3 handfuls of spinach or kale, rinsed
  • 1 red pepper, sliced thin
  • 2-3 green onions, chopped small
  • 8 oz. sweet potato noodles (also called ‘glass’ or ‘cellophane’)
  • 8 oz. beef, sliced thin and marinated for at least 30 minutes (ingredients below)
  • 2 eggs (optional)
  • Cooking oil and salt as needed
  • Marinade for beef:
  • 2 T. soy sauce
  • 2 T. sesame oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 3 t. sesame seeds
  • Black pepper
  • Seasoning sauce for noodles:
  • 2-3 T. sesame oil (based on preference)
  • 2 T. soy sauce
Instructions
  1. In a pot of boiling water, cook spinach or kale for 30 seconds or until wilted. Rinse the leaves in cold water to stop cooking, then squeeze extra water from the leaves. Chop the remaining ‘ball’ of greens into three pieces, then set aside.
  2. In a large frying pan, cook carrots and sweet potatoes until almost soft in a few teaspoons of oil. Add in the marinated beef and onions and cook until beef is no longer pink-you may need to add a bit more cooking oil.
  3. Meanwhile, soak noodles in a pan of boiling water for 10-15 minutes. When done cooking, drain the noodles and rinse with cold water. You can then cut the noodles into smaller pieces and mix with 2-3 T. sesame oil and 2 T. soy sauce. Set aside.
  4. Once the beef is cooked, add the red peppers and green onion and cook for 3-5 minutes. Add in the noodles and spinach and cook until all ingredients are heated through, then cover and remove from heat.
  5. For the eggs, lightly beat together in a small bowl and then pour into a (small) frying pan. You can scramble them, or you can cook them in a circle and cut them into strips on a cutting board with a pizza cutter, like I did (see pictures).
  6. Add the eggs into the noodles, sprinkle with sesame seeds, and serve.

Japchae is a Korean food full of superfoods and healthy fats. Gluten free! | savoringsimple.com

Ever had Japchae? Did you try this recipe? Let me know how it worked!

Spinach Salad (Sageumchi-namul)

Korean Spinach Salad | savoringsimple.comLately I’ve been looking for ways to get more iron and leafy vegetables into my diet, and since spinach is one of my favorite ways to make a salad, I have lots of it in the fridge this week!

I wanted to make a spinach salad that was different then my usual…and the answer came when we visited a shabushabu restaurant last week (post to come). They had the most amazing sesame and spinach salad (called Sageumchi-namul), and I wanted to recreate it.

I’ve had this spinach salad before last week-in fact, it’s a type of banchan (Korean side dish) that’s served at almost every meal, and you can often find this kind of spinach dish mixed into your bibimbap, too…but for some reason, that spinach salad at the restaurant left me yearning to make my own.

This is the easiest recipe in the world. It takes about 3 minutes to prepare, and can be stored in advance for the next meal (although I wouldn’t really recommend freezing it).

Korean Spinach Salad | savoringsimple.com

I do recommend taste-testing before serving…some Korean restaurants make this a little too salty for my taste buds, so I cut out any salt completely-after all, the eater can always add slat depending on their own preference!

Korean Spinach Salad (Sageumchi-namul)

5 from 1 reviews
Spinach Salad (Sageumchi-namul)
Author: 
Cuisine: Korean
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: Serves 2-3
 
Ingredients
  • 3 cups fresh spinach, washed and ends trimmed off
  • 2-3 cups water
  • Dressing:
  • 1 T. sesame oil
  • 1 t. soy sauce
  • 2 tsp. minced garlic (1-2 cloves)
  • 2 t. sesame seeds
  • 1 green onion, chopped small
Instructions
  1. Drop spinach in a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds. Transfer spinach to a colander and rinse with cold water for 1-2 minutes to stop the cooking. Chop the spinach into slightly smaller pieces.
  2. Mix together dressing ingredients.
  3. Combine dressing and spinach. Serve. I like to put my salad in the fridge for 3-5 minutes before eating to keep it slightly chilled.
Korean Spinach Salad (Sageumchi-namul) | savoringsimple.com